A New Review of DIE AND STAY DEAD

In the “better late than never” department, The Urban Politico has published a glowing new review of Die and Stay Dead. Here’s a snippet:

This story is just crying out to be translated into the visual medium. I’m imagining something that draws on Big Trouble in Little China, Angel Heart and National Treasure….What’s really the juicy sweet spot of this story [is] the author’s envisioning of New York City as a special, magical and very old place….Kaufmann weaves a pretty compelling mystery story. This is a book you ought to be reading.

I’ve mentioned before that sales of Dying Is My Business and Die and Stay Dead were disappointing, and that St. Martin’s will only publish the third and final book in the trilogy if sales improve drastically. So if you’re a fan of the series, please tell all your friends. And if you haven’t tried it yet, now’s the perfect time to start!

——

There’s some sad news to report today, too. World Fantasy Award-winning author Tanith Lee has passed away at the much too young age of 67. I interacted with her briefly back in the early 1990s. I worked for The Overlook Press at the time and we were publishing her Secret Books of Paradys series. She was such a good a writer, and she left us with a lifetime’s worth of amazing fiction. Rest in peace, Tanith Lee.

2 responses to “A New Review of DIE AND STAY DEAD”

  1. TJ says:

    Wow that’s heartbreaking that sales weren’t as expected. I truly love this series and would be sorely disappointed if the third book weren’t released! I actually bought both books the day they came out through kindle and stayed up all night reading them. I worry that they merely aren’t advertised very well. I’ll certainly tell friends to go buy them and read them, but I think it’s such small scale 🙁

    • Nick says:

      Thanks so much for your kind words, TJ! It always makes me happy to hear from readers who love the series. It wasn’t just a matter of advertising — so many books just don’t catch on with readers, and no one knows why. If we did know, we could make every book a bestseller! I appreciate you telling your friends to buy them. Even if you think it’s small-scale, it’s not. Every little bit helps. Who knows, that third book may see the light of day eventually because of the help given by you and others like you!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

 

News & Updates

  • 09/22/2020 — Anais Nin at the Grand GuignolAnaïs Nin at the Grand Guignol by Robert Levy My rating: 5 of 5 stars Dark, sexy, and written in a suitably decadent prose style, Robert Levy’s supernatural take on historical figures Anais Nin, Henry Miller, June Miller, and real-life star of the Grand Guignol Paula Maxa will leave you breathless.…Read more »
  • 09/17/2020 — Harrow County, Vol. 2: Twice ToldHarrow County, Vol. 2: Twice Told by Cullen Bunn My rating: 5 of 5 stars Emmy’s long-lost twin sister Kammi visits Harrow County to meet her sister and claim her power, setting off a dark chain of events that turns the haints against Emmy.…Read more »
  • 09/09/2020 — Underworld DreamsUnderworld Dreams by Daniel Braum My rating: 5 of 5 stars This is Daniel Braum’s best collection yet, filled with stories that exhibit a masterful sense of ambiguity and explore the tension between the personal and the profound.…Read more »
  • 08/28/2020 — Harrow County, Vol. 1: Countless HaintsHarrow County, Vol. 1: Countless Haints by Cullen Bunn My rating: 5 of 5 stars A fun, fast-moving setup to what I expect will be a highly enjoyable series, COUNTLESS HAINTS combines writer Cullen Bunn’s masterful use of atmosphere and setting with artist Tyler Crook’s vibrant watercolor illustrations to create something truly compelling.…Read more »
  • 08/26/2020 — Survivor SongSurvivor Song by Paul Tremblay My rating: 5 of 5 stars Paul Tremblay steps away from the ambiguous, maybe-supernatural horror novels he’s been writing over the past few years to present a realistic tale of survival amid a scientifically-based epidemic.…Read more »

Archives

Search