Sunday Reading Reminder

In case you missed the earlier announcements, I’ll be reading from Die and Stay Dead this Sunday as part of the Writers Read NYC series!

WRITERS READ NYC
The Sidewalk Cafe
96 Avenue A (at 6th Street)
6 PM (doors open at 5:30)

If you’re coming, please try to get there at 5:30. These readings fill up fast!

Joining me will be author Gene Albertelli, poet Marcia Loughran, and essayist Malcolm McNeill. There is a $5 cover charge. I will have personal copies of Die and Stay Dead with me to sell and sign, but as I’ve mentioned before, it would be even more helpful if you bought a copy from the bookseller of your choice and brought it with you to the reading. It’s incredibly important that the publisher (and the bookstores) sees this book selling!

Hope to see you Sunday!

Demons and Catwomen

I have a guest post over at SF Signal about demons in pop culture that I think readers will get a kick out of. Here’s a snippet:

You could be forgiven for thinking most demons in pop culture are little girl-possessing Pazuzu clones — hell, in the 1970s and ’80s the Italian film industry produced an entire subgenre of cheap, lurid Exorcist rip-offs because it was so immensely popular at the time — but in actuality, there are plenty of examples in entertainment of demons as corporeal creatures with their own bodies and no need for anyone else’s, thank you very much. One of my favorites is Etrigan from the DC Comics universe. This rhyming demon with superhuman strength and close ties to Hell has crossed paths with superheroes like Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Arrow, and even Batman. Unfortunately for him, Etrigan often finds himself allied with the forces of good — or at least often doing the right thing in the end — which makes him distinctly unpopular with his fellow demons.

And speaking of DC Comics, look what I got my paws on last night: Catwoman #35, written by my good friend Genevieve Valentine! (I managed to snag the issue with its Halloween variant cover.)

catwoman

I read it from front to back the minute I got someplace dry, because New York City last night was a friggin’ monsoon, and I loved it! It’s Catwoman like you’ve never seen her before. Go get yourself a copy!

Where to Find Me at the World Fantasy Convention

World Fantasy 2014 is a-comin’, folks! November 6th through 9th in Washington, D.C., and I’ll be there! The convention has finally announced its programming schedule, and it looks like I’m on a panel Saturday night, during prime bar time. That’s what I get for being a late registrant! But if you’re not in the mood for drinking and socializing, here’s where you can find me:

The Myriad Faces of Dragons
Time: 8pm-9pm, Nov. 8, Washington
Panelists: Michael A. Stackpole, Marie Brennan, Nicholas Kaufmann, James Maxey (M), Naomi Novik
Description: Dragons are a staple in European and Asian mythology and fantasy literature presents them across the spectrum from wise beings to destructive forces, from symbols to complex characters. Whether it is the great warbeasts of Temeraire , the mysterious councilors of A Wizard of Earthsea, the humorous scoundrels of How To Train Your Dragon or the deep and august beast that is Smaug, dragons continue to fascinate and delight. Then there is the treatment of dragons by science fiction authors, such as Anne McCafferty’s Pern and Jack Vance’s The Dragon Masters? Does including a dragon make these works secretly fantasies? A discussion at the various forms of dragons and why they are still are compelling today.

I actually know very little about dragons, despite having written three books now that feature them, so this should be…interesting. Here’s hoping I don’t come off sounding like a fool. Or more a fool than usual, I should say!

I didn’t get a reading slot this year. That’s also what I get for being a late registrant! But despite this minor disappointment, I’m looking forward to the convention. Lots of friends I haven’t seen in ages will be there, as well as many authors whose work I enjoy and admire. Year after year, the World Fantasy Convention is where it’s at!

Horns

HornsHorns by Joe Hill

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

At the heart of Joe Hill’s dark fable sits a bittersweet love story about Ignatius Perrish and Merrin Williams, whose tragic death is the catalyst for both the story and the hero’s transformation. It’s a deeply sad novel, and upsetting at times, but Hill is such a good writer that he guides you through these emotions so skillfully. The characters and their relationships ring authentic, which helps ground the story in the face of its more absurdist supernatural elements. Touching, sad, darkly funny at times, and very effective, this is a novel that will stick with you.

View all my reviews

 

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